Matthew 12:25

“Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand.”

I’m not one to preach, but I was raised in a Christian household and went to church just about every Sunday as a boy. I have since distanced myself from organized religion, but there are certain things happening in today’s world that remind me of biblical predictions my mother used to warn me about.

I posted something on Facebook that started a discussion that showed me just how divided our nation is. I said that I believed President Trump was a racist after I heard about and read his tweets regarding four congresswomen of color. (Click here: Trump’s racist tweets if you want to find out more.) I have never said anything like that before against the Commander in Chief, publicly or privately, to anyone. But this time I felt the need to speak out. At last count, there were 222 comments on my post. (If you go to my Facebook page and scroll down you’ll find the comment.)

Abraham Lincoln used the biblical metaphor in his House Divided Speech in 1858. In it, Mr. Lincoln was concerned with slavery and said: “Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward till it shall become alike lawful in all the States, old as well as new — North as well as South.”

We all know what happened a couple of years after Lincoln’s speech. Are we heading toward another civil war today? Referring back to biblical predictions my mother used to warn me about, here’s another one, from Matthew 24:6: “”You will be hearing of wars and rumors of wars. See that you are not frightened, for those things must take place, but that is not yet the end.”

It’s very hard not to be frightened!

I let them go

I very rarely shed a tear, but I hear that a good cry every now and then is healthy for the soul. I’m not sure I know what a “good” cry is as opposed to a bad one. Is there a difference? If so, how can I tell that the cry I’m feeling will be a good one or a bad one? It must be based on the emotion that brought on the feeling to cry. Sadness is most often associated with crying, I think. But I know there’re joyful occasions of crying too.

When the feeling to cry presents itself it usually arrives with a song I’m listening to. Sometimes the feeling to cry is instagated by a melody I strike up on my guitar, no words, just a melody. I have several of them saved on my iPhone, waiting for words. Melodies always show up for me first, and most often with the cry feeling attached. I wish words would come as easy, but alas, they don’t.

I listen to a lot of folk and Americana music and sometimes the words I hear with the melodies cause a feeling to cry. But I don’t cry, or maybe I can’t for some reason. Perhaps the cry area of my brain doesn’t function normally. Whatever the reason, tears rarely form, but I know they are there, hiding, I can feel them burning the back of my eyes. And there’s that odd feeling in my throat, like tears are trying to come out from there too.

Death is surely one of the top reasons folks cry. But even at that, my tears stay hidden. I remember my maternal grandmother’s funeral, lots of crying, not me. When my dear mother and father passed, my eyes weren’t wet with tears like those of my siblings. Sad stories of friends and family members passing don’t stir me to tears. I feel sad yes, but I don’t cry. I wish I had a normal cry function. I worry though, that if I started crying, I wouldn’t stop. Perhaps oceans of tears are stored somewhere in me, and they’re waiting, waiting for the perfect moment in time when flood gates are no longer needed. Only then will I let them go.