Back to School

Summer is winding down, it will soon be turning much colder, I’m back to driving the school van, and I still haven’t done a Milky Way photo shoot.

My plans to travel west in search of the perfect place will have to wait until next summer. Other things often spring up that take precedence over photoshoots and this year that “other thing” just happens to be our son’s wedding.

I probably could’ve planned a relatively cheap and quick weekend getaway somewhere close but the Milky Way photoshoot I have in mind probably isn’t going to be cheap and quick. There’re lots of great escapes that I know would fit the bill for what I have in mind so I’m probably going to have a hard time choosing.

These United States have many national parks and I’ll just have to buckle down and research as many as possible and choose the one I see that jumps out at me. It must have canyons, waterfalls, mountains, old-growth forests, meadows, creeks, rivers, streams, I could go on and on!

If any of you are into photography like I am, I’d like to suggest a really great alternative to Adobe’s Lightroom Classic photo editing software check out Skylum’s Luminar 3 and I’m certain you’ll see that it’s top-notch. I’ve been using Lightroom for years and I’m just about ready to make the switch!

That’s me below and isn’t that TV screen just lovely? Peace!

I love lilies and daylilies!

Besides roses, my favorite, lilies (Lilium) and daylilies (Hemerocallis) are a big reason why I love gardening. If you can keep the deer away, lilies will give you beauty practically all summer long. Cervidae canter around our backyard from time to time but for the most part they don’t bother much in our garden, which is pleasing to both me and my wife.

In the Lilium family, Asiatic, Oriental, Trumpet, Orienpet, and Tiger are a few types you may want to consider for your garden. But to make things easy, I’d suggest a collection, an Oriental collection to be exact. I think that’s what we planted many years ago and we haven’t been disappointed.

Liliums flower from bulbs, a fleshy scaly thing, about the size of a golf ball, maybe a little bigger, that kind of looks like an oblong onion. It has all the ingredients “neatly packaged” within that will sustain a growing plant into maturity as a beautiful flowering lily.

Over the years we’ve amassed a nice collection of about a half dozen named varieties of both types of lilies. I traded a hosta for my ‘Texas Ranger’ daylily (Hemerocallis) and it’s been flowering now for at least 10 years. Gardeners who’re addicted to hybridizing and growing daylilies are affectionately known as “heme-heads.” It’s easy to see why growing daylilies can be so addictive when you take a look at the many gorgeous varieties!

I haven’t blogged about gardening in quite some time and it feels nice to let my mind wander back to the time when I was the gardening columnist for a local newspaper. Nowadays the gardening columnist in most newspapers is “From AP.” I’m glad to know one or two real gardening columnists, Doug Oster, and Felder Rushing are good friends of mine who first inspired me to write about this passion called gardening and I owe them both a lot of thanks and gratitude!

I’m not one to toot my own horn but if you’re interested in reading a few of my “old” gardening columns I’ve collected a few and put them in a nice little book. Through the Seasons with The Write Gardener can be purchased on Amazon and I’m sure you’ll find it an interesting and entertaining read.

Hemerocallis 'Texas Ranger'
Hemerocallis ‘Texas Ranger’