Matthew 12:25

“Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand.”

I’m not one to preach, but I was raised in a Christian household and went to church just about every Sunday as a boy. I have since distanced myself from organized religion, but there are certain things happening in today’s world that remind me of biblical predictions my mother used to warn me about.

I posted something on Facebook that started a discussion that showed me just how divided our nation is. I said that I believed President Trump was a racist after I heard about and read his tweets regarding four congresswomen of color. (Click here: Trump’s racist tweets if you want to find out more.) I have never said anything like that before against the Commander in Chief, publicly or privately, to anyone. But this time I felt the need to speak out. At last count, there were 222 comments on my post. (If you go to my Facebook page and scroll down you’ll find the comment.)

Abraham Lincoln used the biblical metaphor in his House Divided Speech in 1858. In it, Mr. Lincoln was concerned with slavery and said: “Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward till it shall become alike lawful in all the States, old as well as new — North as well as South.”

We all know what happened a couple of years after Lincoln’s speech. Are we heading toward another civil war today? Referring back to biblical predictions my mother used to warn me about, here’s another one, from Matthew 24:6: “”You will be hearing of wars and rumors of wars. See that you are not frightened, for those things must take place, but that is not yet the end.”

It’s very hard not to be frightened!

I love lilies and daylilies!

Besides roses, my favorite, lilies (Lilium) and daylilies (Hemerocallis) are a big reason why I love gardening. If you can keep the deer away, lilies will give you beauty practically all summer long. Cervidae canter around our backyard from time to time but for the most part they don’t bother much in our garden, which is pleasing to both me and my wife.

In the Lilium family, Asiatic, Oriental, Trumpet, Orienpet, and Tiger are a few types you may want to consider for your garden. But to make things easy, I’d suggest a collection, an Oriental collection to be exact. I think that’s what we planted many years ago and we haven’t been disappointed.

Liliums flower from bulbs, a fleshy scaly thing, about the size of a golf ball, maybe a little bigger, that kind of looks like an oblong onion. It has all the ingredients “neatly packaged” within that will sustain a growing plant into maturity as a beautiful flowering lily.

Over the years we’ve amassed a nice collection of about a half dozen named varieties of both types of lilies. I traded a hosta for my ‘Texas Ranger’ daylily (Hemerocallis) and it’s been flowering now for at least 10 years. Gardeners who’re addicted to hybridizing and growing daylilies are affectionately known as “heme-heads.” It’s easy to see why growing daylilies can be so addictive when you take a look at the many gorgeous varieties!

I haven’t blogged about gardening in quite some time and it feels nice to let my mind wander back to the time when I was the gardening columnist for a local newspaper. Nowadays the gardening columnist in most newspapers is “From AP.” I’m glad to know one or two real gardening columnists, Doug Oster, and Felder Rushing are good friends of mine who first inspired me to write about this passion called gardening and I owe them both a lot of thanks and gratitude!

I’m not one to toot my own horn but if you’re interested in reading a few of my “old” gardening columns I’ve collected a few and put them in a nice little book. Through the Seasons with The Write Gardener can be purchased on Amazon and I’m sure you’ll find it an interesting and entertaining read.

Hemerocallis 'Texas Ranger'
Hemerocallis ‘Texas Ranger’